Truth Before Dishonor

I would rather be right than popular

I Honestly Love You

Posted by John Hitchcock on 2012/04/03


Music quit being produced, for the most part, after the 1980s. That goes without saying. So, when I think about various songs, then and before is where my mind travels. And I remembered a very beautiful love song, so I looked it up on YouTube.

Isn’t it interesting that something you remember as something absolutely beautiful actually has some rotten stench to it after you take the time to actually review it? Absolutely beautiful song — until you get to the rot-filled two-line twist, which completely changes the meaning of the entire song. Despite that, it’s a song that comes up in my mind from time to time.

4 Responses to “I Honestly Love You”

  1. Foxfier said

    I can’t agree about the 80s– if for no other reason than the massive amount of instrumental music coming out of movies, and some other awesome stuff; it just seems like it because the bad stuff hasn’t been filtered yet– but I get that response to a lot of the ’80s stuff.
    Billy Joel’s “only the good die young” still makes me foam at the mouth, and I’m constantly disappointed by listening to the stuff I remember as fun from the oldies station and realizing it’s mostly “have sex with me! Whatever reason you don’t want to– virtue, knowing I’ll use and leave you, tradition– doesn’t matter! Have sex with me!”
    Not that modern songs are immune to that…there’s one that’s popular right now that says something like “come home with me tonight, because we might not see tomorrow.” Had the mental image of someone responding “Yeah, and if, against all probability, we manage to survive a day the deadly world of a pop music song, what then? You go home with some other random girl that might not see tomorrow, figuring it’s best not to test our luck?”

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  2. DNW said

    Foxfier said
    2012/04/03 at 08:03 e

    I can’t agree about the 80s– if for no other reason than the massive amount of instrumental music coming out of movies, and some other awesome stuff; it just seems like it because the bad stuff hasn’t been filtered yet– but I get that response to a lot of the ’80s stuff.
    Billy Joel’s “only the good die young” still makes me foam at the mouth, and I’m constantly disappointed by listening to the stuff I remember as fun from the oldies station and realizing it’s mostly “have sex with me! Whatever reason you don’t want to– virtue, knowing I’ll use and leave you, tradition– doesn’t matter! Have sex with me!””

    Not that modern songs are immune to that…there’s one that’s popular right now that says something like “come home with me tonight, because we might not see tomorrow.” Had the mental image of someone responding “Yeah, and if, against all probability, we manage to survive a day the deadly world of a pop music song, what then? You go home with some other random girl that might not see tomorrow, figuring it’s best not to test our luck?””

    Hell probably features a never-ending soundtrack that plays “Afternoon Delight” and “Nobody does it like You” to the accompaniment of diesel fumes and a six mile long traffic jam at 4pm midsummer.

    Well, love, or sex, themes have always made up a fair portion of popular music’s focus. The thing now, and for a long while in fact, is that its been pretty much the sole theme of much popular music.

    The greatest leveler in terms of interests is apparently sex. No matter how stupid, immature, crass, vulgar, or morally worthless they are, the greater number of people will have their attention drawn to a reference to sex and find it “intellectually” accessible. That’s why it’s used in advertising.

    Whatever then, you might think of say, the old Hank Williams “hillbilly” song “I’m so lonesome I could cry”, a listen to the lyrics will reveal a conceptual sophistication clearly beyond the ken of the present day pierced tongue set.

    I personally think that there were some pretty good tunes put out during and after the 80’s. Some of it by not particularly admirable folks, but the music was – in my opinion – alright even though I can’t say that I would listen to it – you know, while having cocktails on the patio during a Sunday afternoon family cook out. Put on a Stephane Grapelli or Diana Krall CD for that. Or even a Sinatra “song book” selection.

    Anyway, regarding contemporary rock-pop go way back to MTV and 1983’s “Eyes without a Face” by Billy Idol for example Or Nirvana’s” Come as you are” or “In Bloom”. No good? And what about Guns and Roses “Sweet Child of Mine”?

    These songs and many many more all were in the vein of “classic” rock and roll, yet were new sounding. Maybe you were more partial to Green Day?

    John and I have somewhat different tastes in pop music. In part, probably, because we tend to like what we heard as small kids: music that we were only semi-conscious of hearing at first, music that is older than our years.

    It would have made some sense for example, for my father to have liked Elvis, if you were to judge only by approximate age cohort. But he had already been listening to big band music as a 10 and 12 year old, and at 26 the appeal of a 18 year old rock-a-billy artist was lost on him. Elvis in turn played to more exact peers or probably much younger.

    John Lennon was married and playing to 12 year old girls while in the Beatles.

    John H. I think, probably heard ABBA and Olivia Newton John as a little kid. Fortunately Barry Manilow and Elton John were too much even for him! I heard he started smashing his sip cup along the bars of his crib in protest when his mother allowed “Mandy” to play on the stereo.

    Ok then: Here’s something (I might have linked to already – if so, so sorry) as a kind of “peace offering” to those of you with more sentimental and melodic pop music tastes. A bridge across the gap so to speak.

    I came across it somewhat by accident; and, while never liking Hall and Oates who gave me the creeps in a major way, I was impressed by the song’s execution and delivery, and hypnotized by the landscape background off of that deck.

    I’ll take 10 acres of that backyard for my own summer home please. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N48-K9z-HA4

    Just ignore Rundgren’s bizarre get-up, and you might get through the entire video.

    [Edited to add the video to which DNW linked. No other changes were made. DNW’s link, if on a line by itself and fully left, will provide the YouTube video. — admin]

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  3. I absolutely love ABBA!!! And, DSW, you definitely need to redefine my age. On the Shattered Kingdoms forum (Foxfier and I fit that genre), I am known as Pushing40. I’ve been known as that handle since 2004. My handle has been declared a classic in response to those who suggest I be called “Pushing50”. And Mandy? Dang, man!!! That song makes me cry!!!

    Here’s a hint: “Mandy” is a dog he had to lose. Listen to that song, as a dog lover, and try not to cry.

    ABBA was big in the late 70s and early 80s. Ronny Raygun was up for re-election in 84. I voted for him. And it was legal for me to do so.

    DNW, your view of my musical tastes, and your guesstimate of my age, well, they’re both very far off. I love ABBA, Shaun Cassidy, Air Supply, Niel Diamond, BeeGees, Pink Floyd, Alan Parsons Project, Styx. I can get into BTO, Kansas, REZ BAND, REO, Def Leppard, Twisted Sister, Scorpions, Quiet Riot.

    But I absolutely love the ballads!!!! Absolutely love ballads! Soft ballads, power ballads, middlin ballads, ballads about love, love songs that are ballads, ballads, ballads, ballads. Gimme a day filled with ballads (without any bluegrass) and I’ll likely be a happy person (if the songs don’t make me cry too much).

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  4. Oh, and by the way, I own at least 3 different Barry Manilow CDs… that I, myself, bought.

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