Truth Before Dishonor

I would rather be right than popular

Forgiveness And The Results Of Your Actions

Posted by John Hitchcock on 2011/12/14


A wealthy landowner had many acres of land which he could not plant and harvest himself, so he decided to lease out large tracts of land to people who could not afford to own the land but could work the land.

One such farmer, who had no money and no income available to pay a lease offered a trade. He would farm the land and pay a percentage of the yield in return for the rights to farm the land. The wealthy landowner agreed. Their settlement was that the farmer would grow corn on the 1,000 acres of land and the wealthy landowner would receive 20 percent of the sale of the corn.

As planting season approached, the farmer grew more and more dissatisfied with the agreement with the wealthy landowner until the farmer reached a stage of outright anger. How dare the wealthy landowner (who owned the land the farmer was farming) demand 20 percent of the price for something he didn’t even work for?! The farmer decided he’d show the wealthy landowner! He’d plant thistle instead of corn! That’d show the wealthy landowner! So that’s just what the farmer did.

The farmer spent all his seed money on thistle. And then he planted it on the 1,000 acres of land that didn’t belong to him. As the growing season passed, the farmer began to reconsider his decision. His contract required him to grow corn and yet he grew thistle. The profit from the corn was going to provide the farmer an opportunity to buy his own land, yet the farmer had grown so envious of the wealthy landowner that the farmer lost his opportunity to improve his own finances.

And the farmer realized his own hatred and anger and envy ruined his own chances to improve his situation. What’s more, he had a contract which he had blatantly violated.

So the farmer, realizing his own failings and the right of the wealthy landowner to sue him, and the overwhelming proof the landowner was egregiously wronged, begged the wealthy landowner for forgiveness.

The wealthy landowner forgave the farmer. And the thistle grew. And the farmer lost his money and his opportunity to improve himself.

The moral of the story:
You can be forgiven but that won’t change the fact you have to face the consequences of your actions.

Corollary:
You can forgive someone and yet allow that person to face the consequences of his actions.

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