Truth Before Dishonor

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If It’s Job Creation You Want

Posted by John Hitchcock on 2011/08/28


Then you might want to look to where job creation has occurred. Dana Pico posted a pie chart I found very interesting. It shows only 9 states plus Washington DC added jobs from June 2006 to June 2011. (Washington DC is most likely all government jobs, so it doesn’t really count.) While the pie chart focused on the Texas job creation, I wanted to do a little number crunching myself. And of course, the numbers are very interesting.

The pie chart says “with roughly 8 percent of the nation’s population, Texas added 73.4 percent of the nation’s new jobs.” I decided to look at the US as a whole, Texas, and Alaska. Here’s the data I used:

According to the 2010 US Census,
The US population was 308,745,538
Texas population was 25,145,561
Alaska population was 710,231

According to the pie chart,
Texas added 537,500 jobs (73.4 percent of total)
Alaska added 11,500 jobs (1.6 percent of total)

US Job Growth (in thousands)

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the 61 months from June 2006 through June 2011,
US lost 4,818,000 jobs

Now for some number crunching.
Alaska has 0.2 percent of the US population and of the 9 states plus DC that added jobs, Alaska accounts for 1.6 percent of the added jobs.
Texas has 8.1 percent of the US population and of the 9 states plus DC that added jobs, Texas accounts for 73.4 percent of the added jobs.

Alaska added 1,619 jobs per 100,000 population.
Texas added 2,138 jobs per 100,000 population.
US lost 1,561 jobs per 100,000 population.

Subtracting out Alaska and Texas population and job growth,
US lost 5,367,000 jobs total or 1,897 jobs per 100,000 population.

To recap, Alaska and Texas combined for 549,000 new jobs or 2,123 jobs per 100,000 population while the rest of the US lost 5,367,000 jobs or 1,897 jobs per 100,000 population. I suggest Sarah Palin and Rick Perry are both better qualified to create an atmosphere where jobs can be created than either George W Bush or Barack Obama; however, if you look at the BLS chart, the US didn’t start shedding jobs (other than one month in 2006 and two months in 2007) until 2008, and since the new Democrat Congress — both the House and the Senate — was sworn in in January of 2007, George W Bush might, just might get a pass.
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UPDATE: Linked by Texans For Sarah Palin

4 Responses to “If It’s Job Creation You Want”

  1. […] carried the other eight states in each of the last three Presidential elections.) _________ Cross-Post Related postsTenther Scott Walker And Planned ParenthoodAmerican Independence And The Struggle For […]

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  2. Dana Pico said

    Our honored host wrote:

    since the new Democrat Congress — both the House and the Senate – was sworn in in January of 2007, George W Bush might, just might get a pass.

    He always did, from me, because I’ve never thought that the government controlled the economy. By the same token, Barack Obama “gets a pass” as far as the unemployment numbers are concerned, from me, though he certainly doesn’t for urinating away nearly a trillion dollars in the stimulus plan.

    But whether I give Presidents a pass or not, it’s pretty cl;ear that the voters tend to hold the President — and his party — responsible for the state of the economy. Given that the politicians say they can fix things, and claim credit for jobs created (though, for some strange reason, they don’t seem to claim responsibility for jobs lost), then I’d say that it’s perfectly fair for the voters to hold them responsible.

    I’ve said it before: if the economy turns around, and the public see a noticeable improvement in the economy and employment, President Obama will be re-elected; if the economy doesn’t turn around, he won’t be. I really don’t think it’s any more complicated than that.

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  3. I suggest Sarah Palin and Rick Perry are both better qualified to create an atmosphere where jobs can be created

    Presidents and Governors (governments overall) have the capacity to create an atmosphere where jobs can be created or an atmosphere where jobs will be destroyed. Does the government have high taxation or low taxation? Does the government try to micromanage via overclocked regulations or does the government try to get out of the way? Pretty much everything a business needs to grow and be a success is tied into those two things. So, yes, a President can and does have a major impact on economic numbers like job creation. They don’t create jobs; they just provide the atmosphere necessary — or not, in the case of so-called “Progressive” Big Government politicians of either party.

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  4. Texans for Sarah Palin linked me here. Conservatives 4 Palin and Free Press linked my Caffeinated Thoughts cross-post. All in all, I’d say it was a rather successful article.

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