Truth Before Dishonor

I would rather be right than popular

Archive for December, 2009

You Wanted To See What I Look Like

Posted by John Hitchcock on 2009/12/31

Well, now’s your chance to see what a real man looks like.
Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Real Life | Comments Off

Big News!

Posted by John Hitchcock on 2009/12/30

Since Foxfier would never consider this worthy of my site (but it is), I’m posting this for her.

Kit slept for nearly six hours last night!

Take the knowledge that I go onto auto-pilot when I’m short on sleep, and know why the blog is so quiet. ^.^

Posted in Real Life | Comments Off

An 80 Year Old Rap War

Posted by John Hitchcock on 2009/12/29

I don’t really enjoy rap music and I don’t really enjoy poetry, but I just found some poetry that reminded me of the movie 8 Mile. (I believe that’s the movie, the one where nimnimnim is in. My daughter would know.) The movie shows a series of verbal beat-downs set to “music.” The winner is the one who did the best beat-down.

Thanks to Foxfier’s shared RSS feed, I found an article over at Uncommon Descent I enjoyed. O’Leary talked about a rap war that began in 1915 and ended in 1933. He gave a newsreel account of the war and then linked to it so everyone could go back in time to watch the war take place.

Charles Darwin’s grand-daughter started the war in 1915 and GK Chesterton ended it in 1933. It’s a great watch.

Posted in history, humor, Poetry, society, stereotype | 3 Comments »

Lights Of The Season Finale

Posted by John Hitchcock on 2009/12/28

This is the last of the series for this year (despite what I wrote on the first one). So I hope to end it in style. I hope you enjoyed the series and would like to know whether you wish me to do another series next Christmastime.

This one made me think of the troops away from their families.

more after the fold

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Christmas | Comments Off

The Constitution And Liberal Rejection Thereof

Posted by John Hitchcock on 2009/12/28

All my quotes from the Constitution can be quickly found in my side-bar link. And unless otherwise notated, they will all be found in Article I.

Section 1 – The Legislature

All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives.

That means all federal laws and regulations come from Congress. That also means Congress cannot defer those laws to a department or administration which is not Congress. Any federal law or regulation which does not come directly from Congress is unconstitutional (such as USDOT, EPA, other regulations).

Section 8 – Powers of Congress

The Congress shall have Power

To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries

It is very specific exactly how Congress can promote the progress of science and useful Arts. And it is not by providing monies to those things. Providing monies to those things is unconstitutional.

To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any Department or Officer thereof.

This repeats Section 1. Again, Congress makes all the federal laws. No other agency can make any law. And federal regulations are laws.

Amendment 9:

The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.

This amendment is a further tying of the hands of the federal government. It cannot be legitimately read otherwise.

Amendment 10:

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

This is an amplification of Amendment 9. Power not specifically given to the federal government by the Constitution is forbidden. It is reserved to the States or to the people.

Amendment 14:

All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.

None of the states can violate the people’s rights or privileges. And I have already shown where federals laws must be made. I have also shown the very strong limitations on the federal government. This places strong restraints on the state governments.

Overall, a great many laws, a great many governmental agencies and powers for those agencies have been built outside the constitution. Yet the modern-day liberals swear by those agencies and laws which are clearly outside the purview of the government.

I have many other articles related to this but I’ll link three of them (one which is long) here, here and here.

Posted in Constitution, education, Health Care, history, Obama, politically correct, politics, society, truth | 1 Comment »

The Missing Third

Posted by John Hitchcock on 2009/12/27

Nicole has a video everyone should see.

If you haven’t heard of the Conservative Youth Project, you should check it out. The Founders, as they call themselves, are four youth ages 18, 18, 17, 14. And the CYP is growing and learning together. And they are very much willing to be on the front lines in the battle for our country.

Posted in abortion, Christianity, Conservative, education, media, politics, Real Life, Religion, society, truth, Youth | 8 Comments »

Longitudinal Proof Of Media Bias

Posted by John Hitchcock on 2009/12/26

For a long time I have said MSM doesn’t have a liberal bias but rather a liberal agenda. Understand, that’s the same as saying “That’s not a dog. That’s a Great Dane.” Yes, MSM is liberally biased. That is absolutely provable. It is much more difficult to prove my stronger “agenda” claim but I believe the preponderance of evidence shows that agenda rather clearly. I have seen many articles on how MSM will report the foul deeds of Republican office-holders and office-holders. (See what’s missing in that last sentence? Me, too.) I have also noted the scale-shifting techniques of MSM (nearly 100 liberal “good guys” vs several dozen conservative “bad guys” (nine dozen is several dozen, right?) within the same paragraph) and the chosen terminology to describe the “warring factions,” where the liberal “good guys” get called by the name those “good guys” chose while the conservative “bad guys” get called a dysphemistic name the MSM and “good guys” chose for the “bad guys” (Pro-Choice vs anti-abortion).

Do I need to expound on the MSM treatment of the Tea Parties, the Town Hall meetings, the 912 gatherings? How about that alarming report of one of the aforementioned rioters who bit off the finger of one of the “good guys” that got a huge splash? Oops, that was the other way around. Mea culpa and silence the story. How about all those overpowering stories about that black handicapped man who was selling flags at a Town Hall meeting and got sent to the hospital by SEIU thugs and the resultant felony convictions? Never happened? Or the media outrage concerning the New Black Panther thugs who prevented a free vote in Philadelphia and their resultant felony convictions? Oops, didn’t happen either.

But, like I said, there is longitudinal proof of MSM liberal bias. Complete with numbers, facts, graphs, findings, etc.

As the key findings for that graph show, over that 13-year period (16 years by some matrices) the Republican candidates never got even 20 percent of the MSM vote. It is very clear by that graph alone that MSM is very staunchly liberally biased. It cannot be honestly denied. It is also very clear, when studying the position of the populace as a whole, that MSM is quite easily left of the population.

In 1964, the populace voted 61 percent for Johnson while nearly 38.5 percent voted for Goldwater in a clear landslide election. But that is a far cry from the 94-6 vote in MSM. And the geographical graph shows most of the country was less than 60 percent in favor of Johnson (or in favor of Goldwater).

In 1968, Nixon won with just short of 43.5 percent of the vote while Humphrey garnered just over 42.7 percent. That completely destroys MSM’s 86 Humphrey/14 Nixon poll. (Sidenote: DC went over 80 percent Humphrey while MA and RI went over 60 percent (but under 70 percent) Humphrey in the strongest Democrat locations that year.)

In 1972, Nixon won by a landslide. He garnered nearly 60.7 percent of the vote while McGovern gained barely over 37.5 percent. And McGovern only won MA (with less than 60 percent) and DC (with over 70 percent). Again, the population didn’t even come close to matching MSM’s 81-19 McGovern position.

In 1976, Carter received 50 percent of the vote while Ford received 48 percent. Again, only DC voted over 80 percent for Carter and no state gave 70 percent of the vote to Carter. In fact, Carter won 3 states with less than 50 percent. Again, that’s a far cry from the 81-19 MSM vote.

But that only shows 13 years of (ancient) history. What about more “modern” times? Is there any proof MSM is liberally biased nowadays? You betcha there is.

This graph shows that 87.7 percent of the White House press corps who were willing to anonymously release their vote information voted Democrat while only 12.3 percent voted Republican from 1976 to 1992, a period of 17 years (20 years in some matrices). How did the population at large vote? I already provided the 1976 results. Let’s look at the other results in this time-frame.

In 1980, Reagan won with 50-3/4 percent of the vote while Carter gained 41 percent. Three independents shared nearly 8 percent of the vote. In fact, Carter won only six states and DC. Four of those states, Carter won with less than 50 percent of the vote, and DC was the only place Carter got more than 60 percent of the vote. And DC came in over 70 percent for the Democrat. Doesn’t come close to matching up with the pie chart, does it? Are you sensing a longitudinal trend yet?

In 1984, Mondale won MN with less than 50 percent of the vote and DC with over 80 percent. Reagan won 49 states. Reagan also gained 58-3/4 percent of the overall vote in his landslide win, compared to Mondale’s 40-1/2 percent. Again, that MSM pie-chart is totally destroyed by the populace.

In 1988, the elder Bush garnered nearly 53.4 percent of the popular vote while Dukakis garnered close to 45.7 percent. The Libertarian Ron Paul received 0.5 percent. Dukakis won DC with over 80 percent of the vote and 10 states, with less than 60 percent in each of those states. The elder Bush won 40 states, with over 60 percent in 8 of them. Pie chart? What pie chart?

In 1992, the last year of the totally destroyed pie chart, Clinton won with 43 percent of the popular vote. The elder Bush had approaching 37.5 percent. Perot, who was by no means a liberal, gained 18.9 percent of the popular vote. Clinton won four states with less than 40 percent of the vote. To be fair, the elder Bush also won four states with less than 40 percent of the vote. But Clinton, the winner, only won one state with more than 50 percent, his home state (and that with less than 60 percent). Oh, and he won DC with over 80 percent of the vote. Again, that pie chart is wholly inadequate in reflecting the public, and wholly to the left of the public.

But 1992 is a very long time ago. Many voters in the 2008 election cycle weren’t even aware there was a whole new place outside their neighborhood in 1992. For them, I’m still talking about ancient history. Is there anything to my claim regarding history in their awakened lifetimes? In a word: Yes.

Newspaper Editors

In January 1998, Editor & Publisher, the preeminent media trade magazine, conducted a poll of 167 newspaper editors across the country. Investor’s Business Daily reporter Matthew Robinson obtained complete poll results, highlights of which were featured in the MRC’s February 1998 MediaWatch.

KEY FINDINGS:

* In 1992, when just 43 percent of the public voted Democrat Bill Clinton for President, 58 percent of editors surveyed voted for him.

* In 1996, a minority (49 percent) of the American people voted to reelect Clinton, compared to a majority (57 percent) of the editors.

* When asked “How often do journalists’ opinions influence coverage?” a solid majority of the editors (57 percent) conceded it “sometimes” happens while another 14 percent said opinions “often” influence news coverage. In contrast, only one percent claim it “never” happens, and 26 percent say personal views “seldom” influence coverage.

Note this is a poll of editors and not reporters. Also note the reporters polled in 1992 were 12-1 in favor of Clinton. But that doesn’t change the fact there is a clear leftward gap between the people and MSM editors. The 1996 elections were a carbon-copy of editors’ leftward gap with the population. And, as shown in that snapshot, the editors are very much to the right of their own reporters. So if there was a clear leftward gap between the US citizens and the MSM editors and there is a clear leftward gap beween the MSM editors and the reporters…

* When asked “How often do journalists’ opinions influence coverage?” a solid majority of the editors (57 percent) conceded it “sometimes” happens while another 14 percent said opinions “often” influence news coverage. In contrast, only one percent claim it “never” happens, and 26 percent say personal views “seldom” influence coverage.

Let’s defrag this a little, shall we?
Poll of MSM editors, question: How often do journalists’ opinions influence coverage?
It often happens: 14
It sometimes happens: 57
It seldom happens: 26
It never happens: 1
No answer/Don’t know: 2

So, clearly, 97 percent of MSM editors declared journalists’ opinions influenced their coverage, at least on occasion. And the fact that reporters are clearly to the left of editors and editors are clearly to the left of the population at large, what does that say to you about the influenced coverage of political stories?

But let’s get back to the longitudinal study at hand. So far we have for all intents and purposes looked at 1964 to 1998 and found MSM to be consistently and clearly to the left of the general population. And we have seen that the reporters’ opinions do influence their reporting. But what of more recent years? Is there a sudden sea-change? I think not.

Campaign Journalists

New York Times columnist John Tierney surveyed 153 campaign journalists at a press party at the 2004 Democratic National Convention in Boston. Although it was not a scientific sampling, Tierney found a huge preference for Democratic Senator John Kerry over incumbent Republican President George W. Bush, particular among journalists based in Washington, D.C. He found that journalists from outside Washington preferred Kerry by a three-to-one margin, while those who work inside the Beltway favored Kerry’s election by a 12-to-1 ratio.

So the media outside the beltway was 75 percent for Kerry while the media inside the beltway was a whopping 92 percent for Kerry. (Let’s forget the fact that opinion drives reporting for a moment.) And what did the general population say in 2004? Did MSM finally agree with the general population? In a word: NO! The younger Bush won with 50.7 percent of the popular vote and Kerry, MSM’s absolute clear choice, only got 48.3 percent of the vote. The only state Kerry won by more than 60 percent was MA. But, hey, look! A surprise! DC gave Kerry over 80 percent of their vote! Okay, maybe that’s not a surprise after all.

And for you “religious nutjobs” out there, I mean you Christians like me, here’s something to consider:

“We tried to test for a likeability bias. With which presidential nominee, we asked, would you rather be stranded on a desert island? Mr. Kerry was the choice of both groups: 31 to 17 among the Washington journalists, and 51 to 39 among the others. ‘Bush’s religious streak,’ one Florida correspondent said, ‘would drive me nuts on a desert island.’”

In 2008, Obama won with clearly less than 55 percent of the popular vote. And that was despite the sycophantic MSM’s every desperate attempt to prop up Obama and utterly destroy Palin. I didn’t notice a huge amount of anti-McCain stuff but I did notice a huge “ignore Biden” in MSM. Heck, CNN was selling Obama T-shirts and MSNBC was getting tingly (perhaps erotic innuendo?) feelings for Obama.

So now we have incontrovertible evidence that MSM has been clearly to the left of the population since at least 1964, which makes 45 years (49 by some matrices) of liberal bias in the reporters. We have only one percent of editors, who are clearly to the right of reporters and clearly to the left of the population at large, claiming the reporters’ opinions never effect their reporting. And we have current polling, which shows 40 percent of Americans call themselves conservative while only 20 percent call themselves liberal. Add into that mixture the fact that Republicans and Independents both declare, by large margins, that the Republican power-brokers are clearly to the left of the base, and what do we get? We get a liberal media reporting on a liberal government and telling their stories to a conservative population.

Since the US population is so lazy that they’re “not into politics” so they can’t learn for themselves what’s going on in their own country, where they actually get to vote for their servant/leaders, I have to wonder what the elections over the past 45 years or more would’ve been like if MSM mirrored the populace’s political persuasions. There is no doubt in my mind that the liberal MSM has had a hugely deleterious effect on the voting of the conservative population for at least the past 45 years.

Posted in abortion, Christianity, Conservative, education, history, media, Obama, Palin, Personal Responsibility, politically correct, politics, Religion, society, truth | 2 Comments »

The Art Of The Painless Coup

Posted by John Hitchcock on 2009/12/25

The Anchoress writes a strong article (yes, that is redundant) in which she doesn’t just curse the darkness but she turns on a light. You link-surfers out there need to wax your best boards because she provides big surf in this one. I get the feeling anything I might say to add to what she said will only detract from what she said. So I’m providing an excerpt from her article in the hopes that it will entice you to read the whole thing, and to go surfing.

Over the past 40 years these hyperactive First Children have been pulling off small scale coups with varying levels of success. They managed to deconstruct the academies, so that education is less a broadening of knowledge than a narrowing of perspective. They have deconstructed the liturgy to insist that a pantomime in clownface is a vast improvement over 2000 year-old sacrament and liturgy. They have deconstructed government by constructing something so huge and unwieldy that nothing coming out of it is reliable or dependable, and almost no one is accountable, either. They have deconstructed the press to the point where the truth of a story is less important than how it may be framed and spun. They have deconstructed the idea of fascism to mean “those democracies in Israel and America” rather than the freedom-suppressing regimes which surround them.

And all the while they have been busily pulling things apart, they have kept the rest of the family distracted with the television, with the radio, with the cinema – any or all of which have instantly been called into service whenever someone got a little bored and looked around, wondering what these kids were up to. “Abortion?” said Aunt Sally, “Abortion is a terrible thing!” Suddenly every news story is about the grim circumstance of illegal abortion. Suddenly sitcoms are showing the way. “Well, if Maude had an abortion…maybe sometimes it’s a good thing…”

“Free love,” sputtered Uncle Jim, “it’s immoral! It’s damaging to the family!” Suddenly every film hero or heroine is having free, uncomplicated, undamaging sex, and flashing some gratuitous T and A at Uncle Jim in the process. “I dunno,” he smiles to Aunt Sally as he settles back, “maybe it’s not all that bad…”

Posted in abortion, Christianity, Conservative, Constitution, economics, education, history, Israel, media, military, Obama, Personal Responsibility, politically correct, politics, Real Life, Religion, society, truth, war | Comments Off

My Favorite Line From Juno

Posted by John Hitchcock on 2009/12/25

Bren, you’se a [expletive censored]! I love it!

Overall, I strongly approve this movie despite its non-Christian perspective because it is accidentally Pro-Life. For those who have never seen the movie, it is a “bird-and-the-bees” “oops” movie regarding a high school junior and her life as a prego chick.

Yes, there is a lot of coarse language. Yes, the entire movie is inappropriate for the younger ones. Yes, a deleted scene is actually anti-Christian in that it directly ties a Christian to wholly evil stereotypes. But, yes, I strongly suggest every adult who can “consider the source” to watch the movie.

Posted in abortion, Movie Reviews, politics, Religion, society | Comments Off

Lights Of The Season, Part XIV

Posted by John Hitchcock on 2009/12/25

Posted in Christianity, Christmas | 1 Comment »

This Is America On Liberalism

Posted by John Hitchcock on 2009/12/24

Any Questions? Like about that 25 percent graduation rate? Or that statistic that Detroit high schoolers are more likely to go to jail than to graduate high school? Or the fact Detroit schools pay more per student than the national average? Or the total collapse of Detroit?

HT Jackie

Posted in affirmative action, crime, economics, education, Health Care, history, media, Personal Responsibility, politically correct, politics, Real Life, society | 20 Comments »

Lights Of The Season, Part XIII

Posted by John Hitchcock on 2009/12/24

Posted in Christmas | 2 Comments »

Republicans Come In First… Or Third

Posted by John Hitchcock on 2009/12/23

Rasmussen Reports shows a generic Republican will beat a generic Democrat if elections are held today. The spread is larger than any time this year. That’s the good news for Republican congressmen and senators. And that’s good news for the country. The bad news for Republican congressmen and senators, which is even more good news for the country, is when a generic Tea Party candidate is thrown into the mix. While the generic Democrat maintains a 36 percent position, the generic Republican falls from 44 to 18 percent while the generic Tea Party candidate garners 23 percent of the poll.

This is very important for the “governing classes” to see. As I reported previously, the Republican base says, overwhelmingly, that the GOP “governing class” is out of touch with and more liberal than the base. This Rasmussen poll points that out yet again. Gallup shows 40 percent of the population self-describes as conservative and only 20 percent self-describes as liberal.

If the Republican “governing class” want a much stronger success, they will actually get back in touch with the base and become much more conservative, returning to small government, small spending, low taxation, strong national defense positions. That is where the plurality of the people are and that is the winning hand.

Posted in Conservative, media, politics, society, truth | 1 Comment »

Lights Of The Season, Part XII

Posted by John Hitchcock on 2009/12/23

Posted in Christmas | 1 Comment »

A Quote To Remember

Posted by John Hitchcock on 2009/12/23

A liberal commentator on CSPT accidentally reminded me of this quote:

Here, sir, the people govern; here they act by their immediate representatives.
Alexander Hamilton

Posted in Constitution, history, politics, society | Comments Off

 
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